Not for Sale

Show your support for our Finnish friends as they campaign for a change in Finland’s legislation.

So far we have collected more than 50,000 names against the public procurement process of services for people with disabilities, which has led to a decrease in quality of life and wellbeing in Finland.

This means that the Finnish Parliament must debate this issue and it means that there is a very good chance that competitive tendering for social care will cease in Finland.

Today the cheapest service provider wins and people with disabilities are not heard or taken into consideration at all in the process.

For more information about the campaign visit: http://www.eimyytavana.fi

[a translation of the website is possible by viewing it on Google Chrome]

Now that we have collected over 50,000 names in support of the campaign, Punk band Pertti Kurikan Nimipäivät (PKN) is going to play a once in a lifetime gig at the stairs of the Parliament Hall in Helsinki.

Show your support and post your message to Citizen Network Finland on our Facebook page.

Thanks!

Markus Vähälä, Citizen Network Finland

More information

In June 2016, Finland ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which emphasizes the equality of people with disabilities and their involvement in all decision-making. According to the agreement, people with disabilities have the right to choose their place of residence and cannot be obliged to use a particular housing scheme.

We are opposed to the use of competitive tendering to provide essential services for people with disabilities (in accordance with the Procurement Act). This competition policy is in violation of human rights and will be costly in the long term, both humanly and economically. These services necessary for life should be excluded from the scope of the Procurement Act. In many European Union countries this has been done.

As a result of a competitive tendering process, people with disabilities who need help and support do not have choice and control over their own lives. The procurement law reformed in 2016 has not changed the situation. Persons with disabilities are still not involved in this decision-making process that has significant impact on their lives. People with disabilities do not have the right to complain about a procurement decision. This is confirmed by case-law.

Much damage has been done to people with disabilities and their relatives when municipalities reorganise services without people’s permission. People lose their relationships with valued staff and this can have severe consequences for a person’s mental health and their ability to function.